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Updated: 34 min 26 sec ago

Heightened terror risk leads to cancellation of church’s New Year’s Eve party

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 2:34pm

[Anglican Communion News Service]  A church in New South Wales was forced to cancel its traditional New Year’s Eve street party because of the increased terror threat. Since the eve of the millennium in 1999, Saint Aidan’s Church in Longueville, New South Wales, has staged a free open-air New Year’s Eve party. Its location on the banks of the Lane Cove River with fantastic views of Sydney’s world-famous spectacular midnight fireworks show made it a popular choice for Longueville residents. Last year, 4,000 people turned up for the church’s eve-of-midnight concert and barbecue. But senior minister Craig Potter explained that security measures designed to prevent an accident are not sufficient to prevent a deliberate attack.

Read the entire article here.

Archbishop of Cape Town calls for replacement of South African President Jacob Zuma

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 2:31pm

[Anglican Communion News Service] The archbishop of Cape Town, Thabo Makgoba, has called on South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma to be replaced, and for a “carefully targeted cabinet reshuffle.”  Thabo, the primate of Southern Africa, made his comments during a sermon at the Christmas Eve midnight mass in Saint George’s Cathedral, Cape Town. He said that Zuma and his “cohorts of corruption” had been acting as if the South African treasury was their personal property. Thabo’s comments follow the election last month of South Africa’s Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, as the new leader of the African National Congress. Ramaphosa is widely expected to be the next president of South Africa after the country’s general election in 2019.

Read the entire article here.

Se abre el proceso de concesión de becas para los Ministerios de Jóvenes Adultos y Campus

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 11:27am

El proceso de concesión de becas para los Ministerios de Jóvenes Adultos y Campus 2018 está abierto. Las becas brindan fondos para las diócesis, las congregaciones y los centros de estudios superiores/universitarios comunitarios/tribales para un ministerio episcopal (o un ministerio ecuménico con participación episcopal).

Estas becas son para el año lectivo 2018-2019. Un total de 138.000 dólares está disponible para el ciclo 2018-2019 de un total de 400.000 dólares que está disponible para el trienio.

Categorías
Hay cuatro categorías de becas:
Beca de liderazgo: para establecer un nuevo ministerio de campus, restaurar uno latente o re-energizar uno actual.  La beca oscilará entre los 20.000 a 30.000 dólares que pueden ser utilizados dentro de un periodo de dos años.
Becas para ministerio de campus: proveen capital inicial para ayudar la puesta en marcha de ministerios de campus nuevos e innovadores o para mejorar un ministerio existente. Las becas oscilarán entre los 3.000 a 5.000 dólares.
Becas para ministerio de jóvenes adultos: proveen capital inicial para asistir en el inicio de ministerios de jóvenes adultos nuevos e innovadores o para mejorar un ministerio existente. Las becas oscilarán entre los 3.000 a 5.000 dólares.
Becas para proyectos: proveen fondos para un proyecto único que aumentará el impacto del ministerio de jóvenes adultos y campus. Las becas son de 100 a 1.000 dólares.

Proceso
El proceso consiste en tres etapas:

• Planeación y discernimiento de la beca (descargue el PDF)
• Completar la solicitud de beca (descargue el documento de Word)
• Completar y enviar la solicitud aquí. La solicitud debe completarse en su totalidad y enviarse en línea. 

El formulario de solicitud de becas e información adicional están disponibles siguiendo este enlace.

Las solicitudes serán revisadas por un equipo que incluye a los Coordinadores Provinciales del Ministerio de Campus, líderes en el ministerio de jóvenes adultos, miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo y personal de la Iglesia Episcopal.

Cronología
La fecha límite para presentar las solicitudes es el 2 de febrero a las 10 de la noche, hora del este de los Estados Unidos / 9 p. m. hora del Centro / 8 p. m., hora de Montaña  / 7 p. m., hora del Pacífico.
• Del 3 al 16 de febrero las solicitudes de becas son leidas y evaluadas por un equipo de revisores.
• Del 17 al 28 de febrero los revisores de las becas se reúnen para discernir y hacer recomendaciones al Consejo Ejecutivo.
• El 5 de marzo se envían las recomendaciones al Consejo Ejecutivo.
• El Consejo Ejecutivo se reúne del 21 al 23 de abril y toma decisiones.
• Del 25 al 27 de abril se preparan y envían por correo las cartas para las solicitudes exitosas.
• El 30 de abril las becas son anunciadas.

Para más información comuníquese con Valerie Harris, asociada de formación en vharris@episcopalchurch.org.

RIP: Harvey H. Guthrie, Jr., seminary dean and rector

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 10:30am

The Rev. Dr. Harvey H. Guthrie, Jr., sometime dean of the Episcopal Divinity School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and retired rector of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Ann Arbor, Michigan, died on Dec.17in Oxnard, California. He had lived in retirement near Fillmore, California, since 1995.

Serving as the head of one of the Episcopal Church’s leading seminaries from 1969 to 1985, a period of upheaval and change in the church and in higher education, Guthrie led in the creation of the Episcopal Divinity School from a merger of the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge and the Philadelphia Divinity School, in the appointment to its faculty of ordained as well as lay women, and in sometimes controversial curricular innovation stressing individual student initiative based on experience and involvement in ministry.

His educational perspective was ecumenical. He was a leader in the founding of the Boston Theological Institute, a consortium of theological schools in the Boston area, in the bringing of the Jesuit Weston School of Theology into a shared-facilities relationship with EDS involving a joint library program and much joint teaching, and as a holder of many offices including the presidency of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada.

Guthrie also participated in a historic period in the life of the Episcopal Church as a deputy to its General Conventions from 1973 to 1982, as a leader in the movement for the ordination of women, as a participant in the deliberations leading to the 1979 revision of the Book of Common Prayer, and as a long-time advocate for the recognition of gay and lesbian unions and the ordination of openly homosexual members of the church. For many years, he chaired the council of deans of Episcopal seminaries.

In 1985, after 35 years as a seminary teacher and administrator, Guthrie accepted a call to be rector of St. Andrew’s Church, Ann Arbor, Michigan. He saw his ten-year ministry there as practical application of his years of study of the church’s biblical and liturgical heritage. He led in establishing the liturgy as the center of parish life and in the refurbishing of a 19th century building to fit current liturgical practice. At the same time, he presided over a parish much involved in community service and issues, a significant part of whose ministry was a daily meal program for all who would come. His commitment to ecumenism continued in Ann Arbor, and he was a leader both in relationships among the churches and in the founding of an interfaith association including Jews and Muslims and Buddhists as well as Christians.

After his retirement in 1995, he continued occasional preaching and teaching, and worked as a legal aid volunteer, counseling and representing claimants of Social Security and welfare benefits at appeals. In 2012, he was honored by the Diocese of Los Angeles by being appointed an honorary canon.

Guthrie’s early contributions were as a teacher and scholar in biblical studies, particularly of the Hebrew Scriptures. He was the author of God and History in the Old Testament, Israel’s Sacred Songs, and Theology as Thanksgiving: from Israel’s Psalms to the Church’s Eucharist, as well as numerous articles and reviews. He was an instructor at the General Theological Seminary, New York, 1953-58, and a professor at the school in Cambridge from 1958, continuing to hold his chair and teach after becoming its dean in 1969. He had been a visiting lecturer at Columbia University, Andover-Newton Theological School, and St. George’s College in Jerusalem, a visiting scholar at Yale and at Göttingen University in Germany, and the Selwyn Lecturer in the Church in the Province of New Zealand. The Episcopal Divinity School honored him with the endowment of the Harvey H. Guthrie Professorship of Biblical Studies.

He was preceded in death by his wife of 70 years, Doris Peyton Guthrie, and their oldest son, Lawrence. He is survived by his three remaining children, Lynn, Stephen, and Andrew, and by three grandchildren, as well as by his brother, Jim.

The Episcopal Church’s Burial Office and Eucharist will be celebrated at Trinity Episcopal Church, Fillmore, California, on Feb.17 at 10a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to One Step a la Vez (http://www.myonestep.org/) and Trinity Episcopal Church (PO Box 306, Fillmore, CA 93016).

— This obituary was submitted by the Guthrie family.

Stone by stone, repairs gain steam at Washington National Cathedral 6 years after earthquake

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 9:39am

Stone carvers Andy Uhl, left, and Sean Callahan work on pieces of Washington National Cathedral that were damaged in the 2011 earthquake. Photo: Joe Alonso/Washington National Cathedral

[Episcopal News Service] The earthquake that struck the Washington, D.C., area in August 2011 caused an estimated $34 million in damage to Washington National Cathedral. More than six years later, less than half of those repairs are done, and the remaining work could take another decade to complete.

Progress is being made, however, and the Episcopal cathedral last month received a year-end donation from a foundation that will allow it to embark this spring on the next phase of repairs. This latest $1.5 million project will focus on the structure around an interior courtyard, which is the last part of the cathedral still closed to the public.

“It took 83 years to build this place. We’ve had scaffolding on the outside of our building more than we have not. In some ways, we’re kind of used to it,” said Kevin Eckstrom, the cathedral’s chief communications officer.

Repairs to the west towers at the front entrance to Washington National Cathedral were completed in summer 2017. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service

It remains a beautiful building and an iconic religious landmark in the U.S. capital, but Washington National Cathedral also is more than the stones that form it, Eckstrom said. “The staff and the leadership feel very strongly that what’s really important about the building is what goes on inside.”

The courtyard project is a prime example. Known as the garth, it features a fountain and a patio, and reopening it will allow it to be used for weddings, banquets and other gatherings. There also are separate plans to add a columbarium and memorial garden to the space.

The walls surrounding the courtyard aren’t the problem. It’s the two pinnacles above that rotated during the earthquake, causing pieces to fall onto the courtyard below.

“It’s just a lovely space, and it’s another entry into different parts of the cathedral,” said Joe Alonso, the cathedral’s head stone mason. “The northeast end of the cathedral is kind of looming over you.”

The work this spring is just one of nine projects, some completed and other pending, that make up the second phase of earthquake repairs. Phase 1, costing about $10 million, was completed in 2015, focused on the interior of the cathedral and on the largest and oldest buttresses toward the rear. The cathedral was fully closed for just three months in 2011, as crews completed stabilization work in time to reopen that November to host the installation of Diocese of Washington Bishop Mariann Budde.

The rest of the work is being completed as the money is raised through private donations.

“We are committed to finishing the earthquake repairs and returning this glorious building to its original grandeur,” Dean Randy Hollerith said in an emailed statement. “However, those repairs must not, and will not, come before the ministry and mission that happens here. The building is important, but it is just a vehicle for the more vital work of ministry. What happens on the inside is ultimately more important than what people see on the outside.”

Washington National Cathedral’s initial construction was completed in 1990, though it continued to need maintenance and restoration, even before being damaged by the 2011 earthquake. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service

The cathedral is a solid masonry structure, so “the only thing that’s holding it together is gravity and physics and a whole lot of mortar,” Eckstrom said. As it is being repaired, stone by stone, crews are installing stainless steel rods between the stones to make the structure more resistant to the next major earthquake, if and when it strikes.

Crews in 2016 reinstall a pinnacle that was damaged in the earthquake. It was reinforced with the stainless steel rods. Photo: Colin Winterbottom/Washington National Cathedral

About 80 percent of the exterior of the cathedral still needs to be repaired. Some of the fixes have merely entailed reinforcing the structure, while other pieces of towers, pinnacles, buttresses and transepts have been damaged beyond repair and need to be replaced by carving new stone.

Alonso has worked at the cathedral since 1985 and was part of the final phase of its original construction, which was completed in 1990.  The structure continued to need maintenance and restoration in subsequent years but nothing like the aftermath of Aug. 23, 2011., when the magnitude 5.8 earthquake struck. It was centered 84 miles southwest of the cathedral near Mineral, Virginia.

“My God, the day of the earthquake, that was a punch in the gut,” Alonso said. He and his team, though, are making the most of their present work by cleaning and renovating parts of the cathedral that would not have been spruced up for years, such as the ceiling and the stained glass. “The access that we’re gaining with some of the earthquake work, we’re able to do some other needed repairs.”

The biggest repair project left is the central tower, which will cost an estimated $5 million to fix.

“When the quake hit D.C., the seismic waves went to the highest part of the city, which is the hill we’re sitting on,” Eckstrom said. “And they traveled up to the highest part of the building. … That happens to be our central tower.” A similar scenario occurred at the Washington Monument, which is expected to remain closed to the public until 2019.

The cathedral’s central tower is 300 feet, but its four grand pinnacles lost 20 to 30 feet of stonework when the stones fell or had to be removed. What remains is being stabilized with scaffolding until the repairs get the green light. If the cathedral were to receive enough money today to complete the project, it would take about three years, but this and the rest of the repairs on the list likely will stretch over the next decade.

Scaffolding is seen on the central tower of Washington National Cathedral, which was damaged in a 2011 earthquake. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service

Washington National Cathedral is one of only two cathedrals in the United States, and the only Episcopal cathedral, with an active stone shop, Eckstrom said, and Alonso and two stone carvers have been busy since the earthquake. The second phase kicked off with repairs to the cathedral’s north transept in spring 2016. Another project, fixing the iconic west towers at the front of the cathedral, was completed in spring 2017.

These carved faces of Old Testament prophets were part of a turret that was disassembled in summer 2017 and lowered to the ground until it can be repaired. Photo: Colin Winterbottom/Washington National Cathedral

One additional silver lining in the earthquake’s aftermath has been the opportunity to see parts of the cathedral that otherwise would be out of reach. That’s because they’ve been brought down to eye level for repairs.

Last year, a damaged turret 20 stories up had to be taken down and placed on the ground outside the cathedral, allowing for close inspection of its defining feature: the carved faces of eight Old Testament prophets.

The cathedral, unfortunately, has no record of which prophet is which, but “it really gives you a chance to see the craftsmanship that went into creating the building,” Eckstrom said.

– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at dpaulsen@episcopalchurch.org.

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